Kindle Deal – a book set in Turkey and France

Just a quick one today…

I am often disappointed by the Kindle Daily Deals on amazon.com – there’s a plethora of fantasy, paranormal and dull romances (sometimes all in the one novel), but if I do come across a good deal, I usually put in on the Packabook Facebook page.

I know you are not all fans of Facebook, and even if you do follow Packabook there, the chances are the Facebook gods won’t show you the posts in your news feed anyway, so whenever I see a good deal on something I think you might like, I’ll send you a quick email as well. These will always be the kinds of books I wish someone would alert me to when they see them, so trust me, it won’t be that often! And I’ll always put ‘Kindle Deal’ in the subject line, so you know you need to act quickly if you are interested (or, of course, delete it quickly if you are not!).

They will be short and sweet. Just a picture of the book, the Amazon description, and the price – unless I’ve read the book myself of course, in which case I’ll tell you why I think you should buy it! I hope you find this useful…

Please keep in mind that the prices change quickly and without notice, so please always double check it’s the price you want to pay on the Amazon site before you buy it. As always, these links are affiliate links, which means I make a tiny percentage from Amazon if you click through from here, for which I am eternally grateful!

So here’s our first one – Last Train to Istanbul by Ayse Kulin

 

Last train to Istanbul by Ayse Kulin

 

BOOK DESCRIPTION FROM AMAZON: As the daughter of one of Turkey’s last Ottoman pashas, Selva could win the heart of any man in Ankara. Yet the spirited young beauty only has eyes for Rafael Alfandari, the handsome Jewish son of an esteemed court physician. In defiance of their families, they marry, fleeing to Paris to build a new life.

But when the Nazis invade France, the exiled lovers will learn that nothing—not war, not politics, not even religion—can break the bonds of family. For after they learn that Selva is but one of their fellow citizens trapped in France, a handful of brave Turkish diplomats hatch a plan to spirit the Alfandaris and hundreds of innocents, many of whom are Jewish, to safety. Together, they must traverse a war-torn continent, crossing enemy lines and risking everything in a desperate bid for freedom. From Ankara to Paris, Cairo, and Berlin, Last Train to Istanbul is an uplifting tale of love and adventure from Turkey’s beloved bestselling novelist Ayşe Kulin. Right now it’s $1.57

More books set in Turkey here
More books set in France here

Enjoy!

Suzi

 

Disclosure Policy If you click on the links in the posts to buy books, then I will receive a tiny commission for referring you. This does not affect the price you pay for the books, and I am grateful for your support. Every little bit helps! Thank you. (Packabook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com)


Exploring the real life Museum of Innocence in Istanbul

Museum of Innocence collage.jpgAs you know – Packabook’s main aim in life is to find that special sweet spot between novels and travel to help bring real life places alive through the books you read.

And on a recent trip to Istanbul I managed to do that with a bit of a twist – it was more like bringing a book alive by visiting a real live place!

Orhan Pamuk’s The Museum of Innocence is one of Turkey’s most famous novels. It is set in Istanbul – mainly in the 1970s – and tells the story of one man’s obsessive love for his distant relation Füsun. Over time this wealthy businessman, Kemal, collects objects connected to his relationship with Füsun – such as her hair clips, cigarette butts and dirty coffee cups. These objects become a ‘museum’ to his obsession. As well as a love story, the novel is seen as a glimpse into the lives of Istanbul’s wealthy classes and the dilemma they faced in balancing their traditional values with the increasingly attractive Western culture of the time. It addresses issues of sexuality, gender, modernisation and religion, while whipping us along  the streets of Istanbul in vintage American cars and taking us on ferry journeys up the Bosphorus.

But Pamuk has gone a giant step further than most novelists. Several years after writing the novel, he has built a real life Museum of Innocence  in the part of Istanbul where Füsun’s parents have their home, and where Kemal spends a lot of time hoping to catch a few moments with his love (and stealing the odd tea cup for his collection). I have to tell you – I couldn’t wait to go and see it!

Having worked out the museum should only be about a half hour walk from my hotel, I set off on foot – my preferred way of getting around when exploring a new city. Before long, I’d left the main road, and not having the world’s best map with me, found myself slightly disoriented on some steep residential streets. But after a few wrong turns and some energetic twisting of the map, I saw what I was looking for – a corner building painted in a deep maroon color. This was it…

Museum of Innocence - Istanbul, Turkey

The Museum of Innocence – Istanbul – Image by Suzi Butcher

Now I had heard that if you brought along your own copy of the book, you could gain entry to the museum for free. That is because in the book itself, there is a printed ticket for the fictional museum – well it was fictional when the book was written in 2008 because the museum didn’t exist, but since 2012 when the museum opened, I guess it can no longer be considered fictional – very confusing! The entrance to the museum is a tiny little door with this unobtrusive plaque…

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Entrance to the Museum of Innocence – Istanbul – Image by Suzi Butcher

…and you have to walk a few feet further on to find the ticket office, where I handed my book through the bars for stamping. It all felt like I was on some kind of secret mission…

Ticket office at the Museum of Innocence - Istanbul

Ticket office at the Museum of Innocence – Istanbul – Very blurry image by Suzi Butcher

And finally I had my own very special stamp and my ticket. Yay!

Stamped ticket - Museum of Innocence - Istanbul, Turkey

Very excited to have the ticket in my copy of the book stamped! – Image by Suzi Butcher

I have no photos of my own from inside I’m afraid, as cameras are strictly forbidden. But one of the first items you are met with is a giant wall of cigarette butts, 4213 of them in fact, all of which have apparently been smoked by Füsun. Accompanying each of the butts is a little handwritten note which refers to something relating to the day on which she smoked that particular cigarette. Are you beginning to get the idea of how much detail is involved in this exhibition?

The rest of the museum is made up of 83 glass display cabinets, one for each of the chapters in the book. Inside each cabinet are items related to that particular chapter. There are photographs, crockery, glassware, ashtrays, jewelery;  a plethora of everyday items that provide a snapshot of life in Istanbul at the time.

Of course – as a visitor you are then faced with a challenge. How do you reconcile what you are seeing with the book in your hand? Can you really stand in front of each cabinet and read the chapter it relates to and see exactly where the items fit into the story? I have to tell you – I did try. But, I only had three days in Istanbul so it wasn’t exactly practical…even for me, who doesn’t mind spending many hours in a museum!

So instead – I just had to pick some random display cases and read those chapters as I stood in front of them, cross-checking the items with the novel, and then speed-gaze through the rest. It was slightly frustrating as I wanted to know about EVERYTHING and I really wished it hadn’t been such a long time since I’d read the book.

Next time, I’m going to re-read the novel first and then sign up for one of their guided tours, which apparently you can book via email before your visit. I’m not sure how enjoyable the museum would be if you hadn’t actually read the book, though some of the comments on Trip Advisor suggest non-Innocence readers also found value in it. It gets a good four and a half stars from reviewers, though I suspect that most of those who make the effort to visit are already big Pamuk fans, so are pre-conditioned to enjoy it.

What is evident is that this is a huge labor of love for Pamuk. He spent years collecting all the objects as he wrote the novel and a pretty penny putting it all together. Apparently it cost him about as much as he earned for his Nobel Prize – 1.5 million dollars.

After your time in the museum, I’d suggest you wander further up the hill where you will find an interesting array of antique and second-hand shops and a few lovely cafes… all in all, a perfect way to spend an afternoon in Istanbul as a Packabooker.

A cup of tea after visiting the Museum of Innocence - Istanbul, Turkey

Enjoying a cup of tea (and a little bit of a read!) after the museum visit – Image by Suzi Butcher

You can find The Museum of Innocence and many other novels set in Turkey over at the main Packabook site

Suzi

If you are becoming as obsessed as I am, here’s some further reading (some with pictures of inside!)…
Visiting Orhan Pamuk’s ‘Museum of Innocence’ – The Monthly
Orhan Pamuk’s Museum of Innocence opens in Istanbul – CS Monitor
Slideshow of images from the Museum of Innocence – xinhuanet.com

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Disclosure Policy If you click on the links in the posts to buy books, then I will receive a tiny commission for referring you. This does not affect the price you pay for the books, and I am grateful for your support. Every little bit helps! Thank you. (Packabook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com)


Exploring books set in Turkey – World Party Reading Challenge

A quick post today to get us started on our Turkey challenge for the month of November….

For many people, the most obvious writer to spring to mind would be Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk, the creator of novels such as My Name is Red, Snow and The Museum of Innocence.

I am actually most of the way through Museum of Innocence, and while I am enjoying aspects of it, it is kind of a tough read. It might be because I am reading it in fits and bursts, but the novel is a 560-page story of one man’s obsessive love for his cousin, and at times it is truly agonizing. Unfortunately I cannot give you a proper review of this book, as I am now traveling for the rest of November and I am afraid Pamuk is just too big to carry with me, so Museum of Innocence remains unfinished this month.

Instead my novel of choice for this challenge is Gardens of Water by Alan Drew.
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On August 17, 1999, northwestern Turkey was hit by a powerful earthquake which killed around 17,000 people and left about half a million without homes. (More info on the earthquake from the BBC)
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The novel is the story of an Istanbul family and the impact this event had on them, both in the immediate aftermath and many months into the future.
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Shopkeeper Sinan is a Kurdish refugee who desperately tries to keep a hold on his family, religion and values after the earthquake throws everything intochaos. His teenage daughter Irem has fallen in love with an American boy, his home is destroyed, and cultural and religious clashes abound as the city is filled with well-meaning foreigners who have arrived to ‘save’ both the bodies and souls of the victims.
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For those of us with liberal Western upbringings, Sinan’s stubbornness, pride, inability to let go of grudges and patriarchal values will be a challenge, but this is one of the many aspects of the novel I enjoyed. I am forced into Sinan’s shoes. I wouldn’t want him to be my father, but I find myself on his side on many occasions, and willing him to accept that he must adapt to the inevitable changes surrounding him.
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As always I am fascinated by novels based on historical events. I may not have paid a great deal of attention to the 1999 earthquake at the time, but ever since reading this novel, it is etched in my ‘memory’ forever. I had actually read the book several months before the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, and I am sure that my understanding of that disaster was enhanced by reading Gardens of Water. Even now, almost a year later, I know characters similar to Sinan and Irem are continuing to try and rebuild their lives in devastated Haiti, long after the world’s attention has passed.
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I also enjoyed the books’s exploration of the relationship between Turks and Kurds, an ongoing discord which I knew very little about. While the novel does not go into the issue in any great depth, it is always helpful to have characters like Sinan in mind when trying to make sense of historical conflicts such as this.
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So that’s me for Turkey….what are you reading? Are you attempting Pamuk? Or do you have some other wonderful reads you can share with us? For inspiration, have a look at Packabook’s books set in Turkey shopfront, and make your choice.
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Let us know in the comments below what you plan to read and then leave us a link to any reviews of Turkish-linked books on your own blog…
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Suzi

Enjoyed this post? Have a look at our other World Party Reading Challenge selections.

Afghanistan
Greece
Iran
England
Ireland
Jamaica
Pakistan
Russia
Spain
Thailand

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Disclosure Policy If you click on the links in the posts to buy books, then I will receive a tiny commission for referring you. This does not affect the price you pay for the books, and I am grateful for your support. Every little bit helps! Thank you. (Packabook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com)


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Please note - if you read our reviews and click on our links to buy books, we will receive a tiny commission for referring you. This does not affect the price you pay for the books, and we thank you for your support! Packabook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com