Books set in France – What the Bloggers Recommend

Shakespeare and Co - Books set in France As you know we love to highlight books set in Paris on this blog, but today we thought we’d find out what some of the wonderful bloggers in France recommend as THEIR favorite reads. These are people who live and breath French life – so when they suggest a good book, we listen!

Now, you would think coming up with a favorite novel would be easy – but not for Doni from Girls Guide to Paris who says she has so many favourites it was almost impossible to choose.

Eventually she settled on The Razor’s Edge by Somerset Maugham. Books set in Paris

“While it doesn’t ooze Paris or France the way some other books may, it is beautifully written and captures a very particular time and a society that largely doesn’t exist anymore. And since reading it, I always feel quite smart when I have a coupe de Champagne at the Café de la Paix near the Opéra Garnier,” Doni says.

Doni couldn’t help also sneaking in a non-fiction book as well — Time Was Soft There by Jeremy Mercer, a book about his bohemian experience living and writing at Doni’s favourite bookshop in the world, Shakespeare and Co.

Shakespeare and Co. is a delicious bookshop – you really don’t want to go to Paris without dropping in!

Firmly aimed at the fairer sex, Girls Guide to Paris showcases all the latest from the French capital. From where to eat, where to shop and what to wear, Doni and her team of female bloggers will have you living the life of a Parisienne in no time!

—-
Dora Bruder - books set in ParisMartina from Mad About Paris says there is one book you cannot visit Paris without….and that’s Dora Bruder by Patrick Modiano. But she warns you will need to be prepared to enter a world of melancholy.

“Modiano is obsessed with one subject: disappearance,” Martina says.
“In all of his books he’s searching for traces of the past. Not any past, but the time when Paris was under German occupation. All his books are a travel through time. Often the starting point is a small fact, something he found in the archives, in old newspapers, and even old telephone directories.

In this case it was 1988 when Modiano found this announcement in a 1941 newspaper reporting that a 15-year old girl, Dora Bruder, was missing: “oval face, grey-brown eyes, wine-coloured jumper, dark blue skirt and hat, and brown shoes. Contact Monsieur and Madame Bruder, 41, Boulevard Ornano for any relevant information.

For more than a decade Modiano was obsessed with collecting any possible information about Bruder, only to discover she had been deported to Auschwitz. This book is his reconstruction of her life.

For people visiting the France, Dora Bruder is an opportunity to discover and immerse yourself in a Paris which has now disappeared.”

Thanks Martina!

Mad about Paris is not a travel guide and not a city-blog, it’s both of these and much more than this: an online magazine about Paris, the number one tourist destination. The site not only gives you tools and tips for a perfect trip, it also wants to make you dream about Paris, it’s people and it’s stories. It’s for all Paris lovers: a simple way to stay tuned.

.
It’s a dark choice as well from Kristin Espinasse from French Word-A-Day.

Perfume: the Story of a Murderer is set in Paris, but also has scenes in Grasse, the perfume capital of France.
Perfume by Patrick Suskind - France books

“The writer, Patrick Suskind, is amazing at description: the scenes of Paris and of Grasse are so vivid. It is a wickedly evil book… but the writing is so engrossing that it is difficult to put down as one follows, with amazement, the megalomaniac main character, who is a scent genius.”

Kristin and I agree you either love or hate Perfume, but there is only one way to find out which category you fall into, and that’s to give it a go!

Kristin Espinasse is the author of  “Words in a French Life: Lessons in Love & Language from the South of France. She began the blog French Word-A-Day in 2002, with the goal of learning how to write…while teaching others how to learn French.

.
The Piano Shop on the Left Bank - France Books Richard from Eye Prefer Paris is more your burly non-fiction type, so is passing on the novels and suggesting we read The Piano Shop on the Left Bank by Thaddeus Carhart.

“It’s a memoir about an American man who lived in Paris as a child and learns how to play the piano,” Richard says.
.
“He is traumatized by his performance at a recital and vows never to play again. He moves to Paris from the U. S. as a grown man with his wife and young son. On his way to taking his son to school everyday, he stumbles on a piano repair shop and befriends the owner.  What later ensues is him buying a piano and getting in touch again with his passion for the piano and overcoming his childhood fear. There’s a wonderful romanticism about his take on Paris and the Parisians and the story is very moving. Also his description of the Left Bank and his neighbourhood and the interesting & warm people he meets is so enticing that it makes you want to move here. It’s a rich and rewarding true tale and a most inspiring ex-pat memoir.”

Ah – a renewal of passion in Paris – how can we resist!

Eye Prefer Paris is an insiders Paris blog written by Ex-New Yorker Richard Nahem, that posts four times a week with stories and great photos about food, culture, art, pastries & chocolate, shopping, history, and fashion. Richard also leads private insider walking tours of Paris – based on places he writes about on his blog.

This is Paris by Miroslav Sasek - Paris Books

And something quite a bit different from Lindsey of Lost in Cheeseland, whose favourite book set in Paris was actually written for children.  It was published in 1953 and presents a thorough history of the city through vibrant illustrations.

“Miroslav Sasek offers the reader a visual tour of Parisian life – from its monuments, transportation system, and parks to its cafés and evens its animals,” says Lindsey.

This Is Paris is part of a larger collection of “This Is…” city books which includes London, Rome, Venice, New York and San Francisco and although it was written for children, the cultural benefit for adults is just as significant. All of the facts have been updated in recent editions to account for modifications to urban planning and historical sites. Perhaps what is most appealing about the book is how relevant it remains today, vintage aesthetic and all! I offered the book to my young brother this year, it makes a great educational souvenir. “

Lindsey Tramuta is an expat in Paris from Philadelphia and the creator of the blog Lost in Cheeseland – a collection of musings on food, life, love and obstacles in France.

.
So there you have it…a few suggestions from the experts. Thanks guys, you have given us some real treats to explore.

So how about you? Why not give yourself a little Paris time….and order yourself a literary trip to the French capital….I think I’m going to start at the top with The Razor’s Edge and work my way down…

And if you’ve read any of these recommendations, we’d love to hear what you think in the comments. Do our bloggers know their stuff?

Suzi
Travel Deals to top Destinations. Get yours now

Disclosure Policy If you click on the links in the posts to buy books, then I will receive a tiny commission for referring you. This does not affect the price you pay for the books, and I am grateful for your support. Every little bit helps! Thank you. (Packabook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com)


Related Posts with Thumbnails
Be Sociable, Share!
No Comments • Posted in Books set in France, Books set in Paris

Comments

Leave a Comment...

Are you in Europe? You would be better off on our UK site - just click on the flag...

Let’s keep in touch…
Search
Search Form
So many books to read! So many places to go!
More good stuff at pinterest…
Follow Me on Pinterest
Last Minute Travel
Tags
Spread the word….
.
If you would like to spread the word about Packabook, please feel free to use the code below to add the Packabook Blog Button to your own site.
.
<center><a href="http://www.packabook.com/blog"><img src="http://packabook.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/packabook-blog-button.png"/></a></center>
.
Image courtesy of Joseph Robertson. Button design by Charlotte

Please note - if you read our reviews and click on our links to buy books, we will receive a tiny commission for referring you. This does not affect the price you pay for the books, and we thank you for your support! Packabook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com