Retracing Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales – a Modern Day Pilgrimage

A little while back I came across the story of some modern day pilgrims who had decided to retrace the steps of Chaucer’s pilgrims in the Canterbury Tales, by walking from London to Canterbury. I was intrigued, and thought I’d investigate further. The result was this little video

Does this inspire you to read Chaucer’s Tales for yourself?

If so – which version of this 14th century collection of stories should we be tackling…?

According to Henry Eliot, it’s worth having a go at the original Middle English version if you can cope with a bit of a challenge. But if you feel the need for a modern day translation, then this one comes highly recommended.

Henry’s main advice is to not read the tales in order. He reckons you should go for the “juiciest” tales first to get your love of Chaucer flowing, and then tackle the less raucous ones. Dive in and read The Miller’s Tale, The Merchant’s Tale, The Pardoner’s Tale, The Franklin’s Tale, The Reeve’s Tale and The Wife of Bath’s Tale to give you a great taste of what Chaucer was about and then take it from there.

And what if you want to do your own pilgrimage to Canterbury? Here are some more details of Henry’s route from his 2012 pilgrimage that can help you figure out where to go. You will pass some stunning medieval towns and villages as you make your way along the North Kent coast and Canterbury, with its famous cathedral, is a treat. If the four-day walk is a bit much, then you could even do it on a bicycle.

I hope you enjoy the video – it was great fun making it, despite the rain! If you liked it, it would be great if you could give it a thumbs up or a comment on YouTube – it all helps to spread the word.

Thanks…

Suzi

Disclosure Policy If you click on the links in the posts to buy books, then I will receive a tiny commission for referring you. This does not affect the price you pay for the books, and I am grateful for your support. Every little bit helps! Thank you. (Packabook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com)


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Comments

  1. Vera Marie Badertscher

    Absolutely love this. You did a great job of filming, despite the yucky weather! I’d love to be able to experience this–is it a regular tour or was this a one-off?

    [Reply]

    packabook Reply:

    Thanks Vera. I believe it was a one-off when Henry did it in 2012, but so many people asked him to do it again, he did so in 2013. Once he’s got over this year’s trip – perhaps he can be convinced to do it again!

    [Reply]

    • packabook

      Thanks Vera. I believe it was a one-off when Henry did it in 2012, but so many people asked him to do it again, he did so in 2013. Once he’s got over this year’s trip – perhaps he can be convinced to do it again!

      [Reply]

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