Thank goodness for Colin Cotterill…..Books set in Laos

Pha_That_Luang,_Vientiane,_LaosA national symbol of Laos – the Pha That Luang in Vientiane – Image courtesy of Aaron Smith via Wikimedia Commons

Thank goodness for Colin Cotterill…

I mean it, we are very lucky that writer Colin Cotterill exists and that he is so prolific, otherwise we’d be drawing an almost blank for the fiction section of our Laos category. Laos is not a destination of choice for most novelists who write in English, or indeed who do English translations!

Let me introduce Cotterill’s creation – Dr. Siri Paiboun, the protagonist of a series of crime novels, eight of which have been published so far. The series begins in 1976 — Laos has recently become a communist state and 72-year old Siri Paiboun is appointed state coroner. It The Coroner's Lunch by Colin Cotterillsounds like through much of this series, Dr. Siri is desperate to retire, but instead he must do the government’s bidding and handle the variety of cases which come his way, with the help of some outdated medical texts, inadequate supplies and a bit of witchcraft. Known for his wry humor and witty observations, Dr. Siri does his best to get to the truth while keeping the regime happy – not always an easy task.

According to expat-advisory.com Cotterill’s novels are “the best guide books to (the capital) Vientiane”, so we can be assured of lots of detail to help bring the city alive. And as Dr. Siri often branches out into the countryside, we should expect to see quite a lot of the areas surrounding the capital as well.

If you are off to Laos anytime soon, then it looks like the Dr. Siri Paiboun novels are a must read! And I love this article and video from Britain’s Channel 4 in which Cotterill talks about the dearth of literature in Laos, and how he hopes Dr. Siri can help.

For more info on the book and Cotterill himself, try these…
Scene of the Crime
Time Magazine 

But there is one other novel I have discovered that will take you to Vientiane…. The second book in John le Carré’s Karla Trilogy, The Honourable Schoolboy. If you enjoyed the first novel, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy – then why not follow up with this one, which features Laos among other locations.

Find novels set in Laos here 

Oregon Crime… 

Oregon CoastThe Oregon Pacific Coast – Image courtesy of Klaus with K via Wikimedia Commons

Our second destination for this month, and our first US state to be highlighted on Packabook, is Oregon. Chosen in our public vote – Oregon is rich with novels, which like Laos, tend towards the criminal! Of the almost 50 novels discovered so far, well over half of them are crime novels – is there something about Oregon which brings this out in writers? I’ll leave that for the locals to let us know!

This time we have two very prolific writers who have set much of their work in Oregon. Phillip Margolin and Kate Wilhelm. I am fascinated by Wilhelm; aged in her 80s, she is not only a mistress of mystery, but also a well-known science fiction writer. Up to now, she has written nearly 50 novels. I’m exhausted just thinking about it. Oregon is obviously a good place to live – no sign of retirement happening there!

One of the other gems to emerge in our discovery of Oregon is Sometimes A Great Notion by Ken Kesey, who also wrote One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest (thanks for the tip Kirsten and Martha!) Set in the 50s and 60s, the novel is described on Amazon as having the “mythic impact of a Greek tragedy” and is the story of a family of Oregon loggers who defy a bitter strike which rages through a small lumber town.  Amazon reviewers describe it as a “classic of American literature” and possibly the “Great American Novel”. Sounds like a must read.

I’m also tempted by Winterkill by Craig Lesley — the story of a contemporary Native American family and the relationship between fathers and sons, as well as Molly Gloss’s Wild Life. Set on the Northwest frontier in the early 1900s it tells of the adventures of a cigar-smoking, free-thinking woman who writes adventure novels.

With so much to explore, and what sounds like an amazing landscape reflected in these novels, I can’t wait to get myself off to Oregon!

Find novels for Oregon by going to Packabook’s USA page and clicking on ‘Oregon’ under the fiction category on the right hand side.

To the shipyards of England’s north-east…

Tyne BridgeTyne Bridge, Newcastle, Tyne and Wear – Image courtesy of Tagishsimon via Wikimedia Commons

And finally to our English county of choice – Tyne and Wear in the north-east of the country. This one is particularly close to home for me, as it is where my mother’s family is from. The county’s main city is Newcastle-upon-Tyne, known for its port, shipyards and history of coal-mining. But from the 1930s onwards, Newcastle experienced serious decline, with the closing of its last coal pit in the 1950s, and the demise of the shipyards in the 80s and 90s causing extensive unemployment and tough times for those who lived there. In more recent years, Newcastle has re-invented itself as a centre of business and culture, with a lively nightclub scene and some fabulous galleries.

As is to be expected, many of my book discoveries for Tyne and Wear focus on the lives of the working classes, with The Day of the Sardine The Watchers and the Watched by Sid Chaplinand The Watchers and the Watched by Sid Chaplin being two fine examples. The books are recognised as classics of regional working class fiction. And once again, we have chosen a location which attracts the crime novelists – Newcastle’s quayside being a terrific location for all manner of dastardly deeds. Check out the crime novels of Howard Linskey and Martyn Waites to get your fix of north-eastern crime.

Find novels for Tyne and Wear by going to Packabook’s England page and clicking on ‘Tyne and Wear’ under the fiction category on the right hand side.

Thanks everyone for voting for your choices for these new additions to Packabook – and I look forward to announcing the winners for the January voting next week. In the meantime, how about exploring one of these new fiction locations. And if you have any other suggestions for novels which should be added – please let me know in the comments. As always – these selections are just the beginning and will constantly be updated.

Suzi

P.S. Please note that at the moment I have a policy to mainly stick to traditionally published novels here on Packabook. It’s all part of my decision to carefully curate the books that I select. Down the track I will look at adding self-published novels, but for now, I want to be sure that the books I highlight have passed through the eyes of professional editors and publishers.

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Disclosure Policy If you click on the links in the posts to buy books, then I will receive a tiny commission for referring you. This does not affect the price you pay for the books, and I am grateful for your support. Every little bit helps! Thank you. (Packabook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com)


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Comments

  1. Vera Marie Badertscher

    And thank goodness for Packabook for introducing me to Cottrell. I wondered if there was any good reading on Laos. THANK YOU!

    On Oregon–some books on the pioneer days and the covered wagons on the Oregon Trail would be a nice addition. Sorry I don’t have something to recommend off the top of my head.

    [Reply]

    packabook Reply:

    Ah – glad it is of help Vera! Perhaps any of our Oregon Packabookers can come up with some suggestions for suitable covered wagon stories… and I’ll keep a look out for some I can add as we go along.

    [Reply]

    • packabook

      Ah – glad it is of help Vera! Perhaps any of our Oregon Packabookers can come up with some suggestions for suitable covered wagon stories… and I’ll keep a look out for some I can add as we go along.

      [Reply]

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